DIVORCE

Preparing for divorce is one of the most stressful situations that families can endure. It is a time when
you need the assistance of a sympathetic and knowledgeable lawyer who can inform you of your
rights and aggressively pursue them.  The law office of
Denise Williams will sit down with you,
evaluate your case and advise you of your options. I understand the important matters related to
divorce and I am familiar with the Te
xas family law court system. I have the experience and knowledge
to mediate divorce settlements or pursue litigation to completion in divorce court.  If you have legal
concerns regarding divorce, Contact Us today - 713-914-0700.

Divorce - An Overview
Contemplating divorce is always difficult. Whether you are sure you want to end your marriage or are
still considering your options, it helps to learn the basics of divorce law and process. Should you
conclude that divorce is necessary, it is very important that you seek the assistance of an experienced
family law attorney. Involving a knowledgeable family law attorney as soon as possible in the divorce
process is one of the best ways to preserve your own long-term financial and emotional health.

Grounds for Divorce
A divorce is a method of terminating a marriage contract between two individuals. From a legal
standpoint, a divorce will give each person the legal right to marry someone else, divide the couple's
assets and debts and determine the future care and custody of their children. While each state has
individual statutes that address these issues differently, the basic principles the states follow when
considering requests for divorce are relatively uniform.

Division of Property
When there is little or no marital property, no children, no issues of alimony or spousal maintenance,
amicable spouses can usually obtain a quick divorce. Most divorces, however, are quite different and
far more complex. The typical divorce involves a union of many years with considerable marital
property, both personal property and real estate, children, family businesses, large or concealed
debts, trust funds, real estate in other states, joint and separate accounts, investments, insurance,
pensions, and other assets. In these complex situations, the parties often cannot divide their property
on their own and therefore may require court involvement for its ultimate division.

Questions to Ask During Divorce
Considering whether you should end your marriage is one of the most important and difficult
decisions you will ever encounter. It is important to approach the question from a rational perspective
rather than solely an emotional one. In many ways it is a business decision that requires you to
evaluate many issues. Once you review this list of questions, you may rethink the direction you are
headed, or you will be better prepared to move forward while working with an attorney.

How to Move On
Recovering from a divorce is similar to the grieving process one experiences when a loved one dies.
There are five stages in the process: shock and denial, anger, ambivalence, depression and recovery.
Many people expect to work through these stages one after the other, but that isn't usually how it
happens. You can expect to move in and out of each phase over time and sometimes experience
more than one phase at the same time. It is a difficult process and time consuming. Family
counselors advise it may take as long as two years to fully recover.

An Amicable Divorce
Divorce is one of the most emotional experiences a person will ever face. The decision to end a
marriage is not an easy one and is often accompanied with anger, fear, and resentment. The negative
emotions associated with divorce are responsible for more than hurt feelings; they affect the final
outcome of settlement negotiations. Most important, if children are involved, they will suffer. It is in your
best interest to approach divorce from an amicable perspective. This will allow you to put on your
business hat, which is critical for reaching a successful settlement. It will also allow you to put on your
effective parent hat, which is critical for helping your children through this difficult process.

Frequently Asked Questions About Divorce

Q: What is a legal divorce?

A: A divorce is a method of terminating a marriage contract between two individuals. From a legal
standpoint, your divorce will give each person the legal right to marry someone else, it will legally
divide the couple's assets and debts, and determine the care and custody of their children. Each state
addresses these issues differently, but there are some relatively uniform standards. Each state does
have some type of "no fault" divorce laws that can significantly simplify the divorce process.

Q: What is a no fault divorce?

A: Traditionally, divorce was granted on the basis of some marital misconduct such as adultery or
physical abuse. In these cases the "guilty" spouse was punished by getting a smaller share of the
couple's property or being denied custody of their children while the "innocent" spouse was rewarded
for being faithful to the vows of marriage. In a no fault divorce, however, both parties agree that there is
no "fault" involved in the grounds for divorce. In fact, any misconduct is irrelevant to the divorce
proceedings. A marriage can be terminated simply because the couple agrees that it is no longer
salvageable.

Please note that states' laws differ on the issue of fault or no fault divorce. Among the 50 states, 15
provide no fault divorce as their residents' only choice; residents of other states may pursue fault
based or no fault divorce.

Q: What is a fault-based divorce?

A: A "fault" divorce is one in which one party blames the other for the failure of the marriage by citing a
legal wrong. Grounds for fault can include adultery, physical or mental cruelty, desertion, alcohol or
drug abuse, insanity, impotence or infecting the other spouse with a venereal disease.

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THE LAW OFFICE
OF
DENISE WILLIAMS

6001 Savoy,  Suite 512
Houston, TX 77036

Office: 713-914-0963
Fax: 713-334-3270
The information provided in this website is offered for informational purposes only; it is not offered as and does not constitute legal advice. Replies to
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The information provided in this website is offered for informational purposes only; it is not offered as and does not constitute legal advice. Replies to
e-mail messages, if any, will be from a licensed attorney but will be general in nature and will not form an attorney-client relationship. Be aware that
the confidentiality of information sent over the internet may not be legally or otherwise protected.

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THE LAW OFFICE
OF
DENISE WILLIAMS

6001 Savoy,  Suite 512
Houston, TX 77036

Office: 713-914-0700
Fax: 713-914-0963